March 2015

It all started with a photograph in Garden Answers magazine. It was of a painted garden bench between two climbing roses, and looked stunning. Plus it was to illustrate focal points within a small garden, something I needed too. The thing is, I have two climbing roses and a bench next to the greenhouse. It wasn’t my favourite and so was used as a place to harden off plants. Its legs were rotten with neglect but exactly the right width to go between my roses. So a plan was hatched to replicate the picture. After much sanding, treating and painting I now have a lovely seat that is perfect for the job.

Garden Answers March 2015. Images Copyrigt John Glover/Alamy
A 'before' photo on a new seating area.
A ‘before’ photo on a new seating area.

The area between the two roses needed work too. I relocated a purple heuchera, a sedum, and then viciously pruned a Hebe to make space. I laid weed suppressant and gravelled over the area. There was already some snowdrops that had either self-seeded or flown in with the birds, so I added a few more from my front garden.

Miniature narcissi brigtens up the gravel.
Miniature narcissi brigtens up the gravel.

Keeping the colour palette grey, white and a splash of yellow, I bought some miniature narcissi, then added yellow primroses and a pale yellow camellia. I decided to use metal containers for this area as they look so chic. I planted white cyclamen with grey calocephalus . Rosemary and senecio cineraria ‘Silver Dust’. A white cyclamen lights up a collection of ferns. Bushy lavenders also found their way into the gravel bed with some black grass that I always seem to have an abundance of.

Metal containers look so glam!
Metal containers look so glam!
Cyclmen snuggled in with the ferns with pine cone top-dressing.
Cyclmen snuggled in with the ferns with pine cone top-dressing.

This sunny side of the garden is a perfect spot in springtime to sit and relax but what I am really waiting for is the summer when the roses will be in bloom.

The shady side of the garden is a nightmare. It has been severely hacked back to give access for workmen. A purple hazel had too much growth from the bottom and this needed cutting out. Plus a buddleia welcomed a chop too. But what has really alarmed me is the damage caused not by the builders but my pet hate: vine weevils.

Evil lies within!
Evil lies within!

I treated the rhododendrons last autumn but they have been feasting on the pale yellow one that’s in the ground all winter, whilst leaving the one that’s in a container unharmed. I’m not risking it though and so treatment is number one priority.

GA cover March 2015 hiresGarden Answers is published every four weeks in the UK. Subcribe at http://www.greatmagazines.co.uk

 

 

 

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A blog about my gardening exploits to inspire, even if its looking like its all about go wrong. (Which it does, alot)

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